How to Make Coffee that Doesn’t Suck: The Aeropress

One of my favorite gadgets to use for making coffee, both in my kitchen and in the woods, is the Aeropress Coffee and Espresso Maker. It’s stupid easy, and I can use either coarse ground or fine ground coffee. It takes about 3 minutes to make a full cup of rather strong coffee, and the device itself is nearly indestructible. Want to see why’s it’s so awesome? Read on.

The Aeropress contains 3 pieces and assembles like a syringe. Weighing less than a quarter of a pound, it’s really quite light and unobtrusive in my kitchen.

1. Assemble your Aeropress

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The Aeropress, assembled.

Seriously, I’m sorry to have to explain this, but the assembly follows basic anatomy. You figure that symbolism out. Put it together and put it UPSIDE DOWN on your table.

2. It puts the coffee into the Aeropress.

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Scooping your coffee into your Aeropress

Sorry about the flash on my camera, I was using my point-and-shoot and the flash gets a little out of control sometimes. Anyway. I use two heaping tablespoons full of coarse ground coffee, which yields around 4 ounces of coffee. If you’re using fine (espresso) ground coffee, use a single tablespoon and half the water. Any more and your filter will clog.

3. Pour your water into the Aeropress

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Your coffee, wet. Not done yet though!

As I’ve said before, your water should be between 195-205 degrees. I use my coffee brewer to heat up the water, but you can just as easily use your microwave. Once your water is hot enough, pour your water into something that has a spout and fill your Aeropress to the top, ensuring you cover ALL the grounds with water. Let this sit between 10 seconds and 5 minutes. The longer you let it sit, the stronger your coffee will be.

5. Stir

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Your coffee will bloom and look just like this.

Once you’ve waited between ten seconds and two minutes, stir your coffee. I use a knife, but you can use a stick or whatever. Spoons generally don’t work, as they make the press overflow and that sucks.

6. Cap

 

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The cap.

That little piece you saw in the first picture up there? That was the cap, designed to work with the paper Aeropress filter. The paper filters included with your press are advertised as washable and reusable, but they’re cheap enough to compost without guilt. They include about 100 filters with the press, so I’m using them until they’re gone. They also packs of 700 for about $10.

7. Invert.

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Your Aeropress, inverted

All you have to do now is flip your press over onto a coffee mug. Mine is from the J&S Bean Factory in St Paul, one of my favorite little coffee houses. To avoid a mess, invert your empty mug, place it on top of the filter, and THEN flip the whole thing over.

8. Push Down.

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Now all you have to do is push down. The hot water is forced through the coffee and the filter and into your cup. Repeat for more coffee.

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And there we have it. A foamy, delicious cup of coffee.

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Author: El Chris

I'm full of snark that doesn't always come out. I have a soft spot for kids and people with special needs. I'm a disability advocate by day, and a coffee roasting photographer by night. You'll love me, but your parents will love me more.

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